Wednesday, March 04, 2009

Fables 11: War and Pieces

Prince Charming isn't dead. It just doesn't make sense--it took forever to kill Goldilocks (is she even dead for sure?) because she was too popular in the Mundy world. Snow White survived being shot in the head, her brains scattered all over the farm because she was too popular. Snow White, Sleeping Beauty, and Cinderella are some of THE most popular fairy tales in the Western Mundy world and Prince Charming stars in ALL of them. He's too popular. He can't be dead. It just doesn't make sense!

4 Comments:

Blogger aderksen said...

This volume left me with two questions. I agree with your assessment of the first question - Charming almost certainly isn't dead. For all his shallow personality, he has shown himself time and again to be a careful strategist and tactician. Look at how well he set up Blue Beard.

No, I think that Charming is aware of the potential deeper threats to the Fables, which brings me to my second question... Exactly what is going on in the page showing the Adversary signing the Fabletown Charter? Did anyone else notice that everyone on that double-page spread has an identical facial expression?

Perhaps I'm just paranoid, but it also appears that the focal element of that image is also just a little off center - I don't see it focusing on Geppetto signing the Charter. What supremely powerful witch of mysterious power-sources and questionable motives is sitting there just behind his shoulder, eh?

11:06 AM  
Blogger aderksen said...

Speaking of which, does anyone want to speculate on her ethically questionable power-sources in the mortal world?

11:07 AM  
Blogger Nymeth said...

I've seen people say it has to do with aborted foetuses, but I'm not sure how I feel about that, and I wonder if Willingham would go there.

12:10 PM  
Blogger aderksen said...

Interesting. That was my suspicion, given her history. I assume that she owns some very legitimate abortion clinics - but I have seen no textual evidence to support this conjecture yet. It would be a nice and thoughtful touch, putting her in yet another nebulous and contentious moral gray area. If this is what Willingham has in mind for her character, then I salute him for tackling such a difficult issue. It will probably provide a wedge to divide our protagonists on very different responses to the same issue... much as the issue divides our own electorate.

12:28 PM  

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